Looking to Move? Learn From Someone That’s Done it a Lot!

Moving is hard work. Especially if you do it a lot and don’t plan very well one move to the next. We found this blog written by someone in New York City that was moving out of the country and wanted to share what she had learned with other people. We hope it will help you be more prepared for your next move!

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From the article:

Here are a few things I’ve learned along the way:

1. Don’t ignore your doubts and hesitations.
In a way, apartment hunting is like shoe shopping. I often fall in love with shoes that look fantastic and feel okay, besides just one little pinch, which I tell myself I’ll get used to.

But I don’t. And the pinch becomes a bloody hole that forces me, eventually (after trying to pair the shoes with bandages, to no avail) to throw the f—ers out.

Unfortunately the same can’t be done, quite as easily, with apartments.

Despite whatever I initially told myself, I never got over the lack of closet space in my first Astoria apartment. I grumbled and cursed every time I had to wipe cat litter off my feet in my second apartment. (I hated that litter box in the bathroom the first time I laid eyes on it!) And I never adjusted to the roar of the G and F trains that shook the windows of my Gowanus walk-up over and over again.

Once you sign a lease, that noise or smell or neighbor that you think you’ll get used to will be yours to deal with for longer than you’d like.

2. Be honest and upfront.
This one pertains to the art of roommating. New York apartments are tiny, which makes it especially important to understand boundaries, responsibilities, and just how frequently your roommates will be there.

In the living room.

Watching foreign films at an egregious volume late into the night.

I used to hate when people posted ads to Craigslist bluntly requesting that anyone who spends a lot of time at home not apply. I might not make that sort of request quite so directly, but I wouldn’t be shy about common-space questions.

Find out ahead of time how often prospective roommates are home, what they typically do on the weekends, how often they have friends over to visit, and how often they might hang out in the common space…or else prepare to share space with someone who practices his Rosetta Stone (German) and guitar (Bob Dylan) in the living room every night until 1 a.m.

Read the entire article here: http://www.brickunderground.com/blog/2013/06/lessons_learned_after_5_apartments_9_roommates_and_7_years_in_new_york_city

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